18 English Dog Breeds



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I have trained and worked in animal care as well as in career advising. I live in Lancashire, in the UK.

Some dog breeds (such as the bloodhound) originated so long ago that it is hard to ascertain exactly where they were developed. For some breeds, the name is a clue to their birthplace—for example, the Norfolk terrier. More recent breeds may have a well-documented history, especially if an individual breeder set out with the purpose of creating a dog breed for a specific purpose or appearance.

This is all about breeds which we can be fairly confident originated or were mainly developed in England. It won't be an exhaustive list, but will contain well-known and less-well-known examples of English breeds. They have been divided into the sevengroups listed by The Kennel Club.

Gundogs

Not surprisingly, the gundog group was bred for accompanying their owners out on a shoot, being used to scent out (hunt and point) game (usually birds) and retrieve injured and dead game. Due to the popularity of hunting amongst the English gentry, quite a lot of gundog breeds have been developed here.

Other breeds from this group which I could have included are the clumber spaniel, Sussex spaniel, field spaniel, springer spaniel and English setter.

1. Curly Coated Retrievers

The curly coated retriever is believed to have originated in England around 200 years ago. Various breeds will have contributed to its development such as poodles and perhaps the Tweed water spaniel - an extinct breed. The curly coated retriever comes in two colours; black or liver (brown)

It is a gundog and still used in gundog trials and by some gamekeepers, however the rise of the labrador retriever meant that the breed decreased in popularity as a gundog in the 20th century.The tight curly coat is waterproof and shakes dry quite satisfactorily - it was purposely developed for retrieving game from water. It is now classed as a vulnerable native breed by the British Kennel Club..

2. English Cocker Spaniels

A very popular breed, the cocker spaniel was developed as a gundog for flushing woodcock in particular. However it is easy to see how their appealing looks and charm gained them fans amongst pet dog owners and breeders. There are now two strains with the working cocker and the show cocker having diverged somewhat.

3. English Pointers

The English pointer almost certainly has Spanish ancestors and to my mind as a working dog its short comparatively thin coat is perhaps more suited to the milder and dryer climate of Spain than the wet and often cold UK.

I've known quite a lot of English pointers and chuckled at the Kennel clubs description of the English pointer being "clearly most at home on the moors, where he in his true element." The ones I knew were most at home curled in a heap in a comfy bed and looked quite horrified if asked to go out in the rain or mud.

4. Flat Coated Retrievers

The flat coated retriever, despite being superficially similar to a golden retriever, is a lighter weight and leggier dog. It owes some of its appearance to setter and imported Newfoundland wavy-coated retrievers. As a result are known for their ability to retrieve from water as well as on land.

The 19th century was a time when a significant number of breeds were developed in the gundog world. Hunting and shooting were extremely popular pass times and the large estates could afford to run large kennels of dogs. Flat coated retrievers became known around 1864 and quickly became popular for their working ability.

The modern flat coated retriever can be worked, shown and a family pet. Unlike the spaniel breeds which have split into working and show lines the show flat coated retriever can still hold its own as a gundog.

5. Golden Retrievers

The golden retriever is a hugely popular breed worldwide being attractive, adaptable and amenable. I debated whether to count the breed as an English one, because it has strong claims to being developed in Scotland albeit under the management of an English lord.

The human father of the breed was Lord Tweedmouth of Berwick upon Tweed which is firmly in England. One of the breeds he used was the Tweed water-spaniel popular in Northumberland and on the opposite side of the Tweed in Scotland. However he bred them at his Scottish home the Guisachan Estate, so they are really Scottish in origin. I've sneaked them in anyway. It's hard to resist a golden retriever!

Pastoral Breeds

Some of the pastoral breeds, like the border collie, were developed for herding livestock such as sheep and cattle. They are renowned for their stamina and intelligence others such as the Pyrenean mountain dog were bred to live with the flock and guard them from predators. These tend to be less active but with a strong guarding instinct.

6. Old English Sheepdogs

Although it's name indicates that the old English sheepdog is an archetypal English breeds it almost certainly had European breeds such as the corded coated Bergamasco in its development These were bred to lighter coated sheepdogs from England. However the end result still has a very profuse and instantly recognisable coat.

Despite having presumably been bred for working sheep I haven't come across any evidence of them still being used as a working breed. They have recently been put on the 'at watch' list with the British Kennel club as the numbers of old English sheepdog puppies being registered each year has fallen.

7. Lancashire Heelers

The Lancashire heeler is a pastoral breed which was almost lost until efforts in the 1980s were made to boost the numbers of the breed by people such as Jean Lanning, a breeder and international dog judge. They are still listed as a vulnerable native breed but numbers are more healthy especially in their home county of Lancashire.

In a similar mould to the corgi they were originally cattle dogs and would harry the cattle along by nipping their heels when necessary, so they can be quite feisty. They also have stamina.

8. Border Collies

Border collies can claim to be a truly British breed rather than an English one. They originated in hill country where sheep were kept, so Wales, Scotland and Northern England all contributed to the breed.

Although they are an active breed there is considerable difference between the show strain and working strains which are still widely used on farms throughout the world. The show strain enjoys plenty of exercise and mental stimulation but that requirement is more than doubled in a working dog who would really need some sort of job to do, like agility training, even as a pet.

Hounds

Hounds were bred for hunting and killing specific prey whether that was rabbits, foxes deer or wolves. Some, like the foxhound, were bred with stamina to hunt by scent in packs whilst others, such as the greyhound, were bred for speed and more often hunt alone or in pairs.

Other breeds I could have featured are the beagle, otterhound and whippet.

9. Foxhounds

The foxhound is listed as possibly the most vulnerable native English breed with no puppies registered with the kennel club last year. They have always been very much working dogs for hunting foxes, with few kept as pets despite their friendly temperaments. Perhaps people are put off by their reputation for stubbornness and their stamina.

Despite the lack of registrations with the Kennel club there are still packs of foxhounds kept for hunting. Strictly speaking hunting animals with dogs is illegal in the UK since the Hunting Act 2004 was passed, but packs can hunt a human runner laying a trail.

10. Bloodhounds

The bloodhound has been bred in England since before 1300 which gives it a fairly strong claim to being an English breed. Literature does indicate that there were probably Belgian dogs used in the development of the breed, so there may be a claim further back for it being of European origin.

Although originally bred for hunting deer and wild boar, the exceptional tracking ability of the bloodhound was soon recognised as being useful for tracking humans - initially criminals. There are now a number of packs of bloodhounds in the UK kept for hunting. Usually this takes the form of hunting a human runner who sets off ahead of the dogs which gives a trail for them to follow. I have enjoyed watching the Readyfield Bloodhounds on foot on a couple of occasions, but was never confident enough at jumping to join them on horseback.

11. Greyhounds

I might have a fight on my hands listing the greyhound as an English breed. Arguably greyhound type dogs are one of the earliest breeds known as they are portrayed in ancient Egyptian tombs and on Roman pottery. However from these original dogs long legged sight hounds were developed by most area or countries, resulting in the Ibizan hound, the saluki (from the middle east), the sloughi from north Africa, the greyhound in England and many others.

The greyhound was already well known in England in the middle ages. For example, King Canute made laws in 1014 allowing greyhounds to be owned and hunted by the nobility alone. Any common person caught owning a greyhound would be severely punished.

The modern greyhound is more popular as a racing dog then as a show dog, but valiant efforts by greyhound charities to raise the profile of the breed as a pet has meant that increasing numbers of ex-racing greyhounds find their way into the comfort of home life and happily swap the racetrack for a comfy sofa.

Terriers

A feisty group of mostly small to medium sized breeds who were bred to pursue and often to kill animals which were considered to be vermin.

Other breeds I could have included are the Airedale terrier, English bull terrier and miniature bull terrier, fox terriers, lakeland terrier, Manchester terrier and dandie dinmont terrier.

12. Staffordshire Bull Terriers

The Staffordshire bull terrier, affectionately known as the staffie, is one of the most popular breeds in the UK at the moment. Sadly this also means that it is the breed most commonly found in dog rehoming centres around the country.

Dogs resembling the staffie and known as bull terriers, existed in the 17th century as a breed for use in dog fighting which was popular and legal at the time.

In 1835 dog fighting was made illegal and at this point some dog breeders from the English county of Staffordshire determined to preserve the breed as a show dog and pet. Hence it became known as the Staffordshire bull terrier.

The breed had always been known for its sweet nature towards humans and it is one of the few breeds to have a breed standard that specifies that it is good with children. The breed comes in a wide variety of solid colours and also patches of colour on a white coat.

Staffordshire Bull Terrier

13. Norfolk and Norwich Terriers

The Norfolk and the Norwich Terrier are two delightful little terrier breeds developed in the same area - Norwich being the county town of Norfolk in the east of England. They were originally tough farm terriers used to keep the rat population under control.

The easiest way to distinguish between the two is that Norwich terriers have pricked ears (like the steeple of Norwich cathedral) and Norfolk terriers have semi erect ears which are distinctly floppy looking. They were only split into two breeds in 1964 - hence they really are rather similar in everything other than ear carriage.

14. Jack Russell and Parson Russell Terriers

Since Victorian times, England had been home to a strain of terriers known as Jack Russells. They were generally a mix of white and one or two other colours, could be short or long legged and rough or smooth coated. They were very popular, but not recognised under Kennel club rules.

They originated from dogs bred by the Reverend John Russell (1795-1883) who was also instrumental in breeding lines of smooth fox terriers. After his death, enthusiasts kept the breed as close as they could to the Reverend's ideals until in 1990 the Kennel club formally recognised the breed and in 1999 settled on the name Parson Russell terrier to differentiate from the unregistered Jack Russell terriers throughout the country.

15. Border Terriers

As its name suggests, the border terrier originated in the borders of England and Scotland, however it was especially associated with the Border hunt in Northumberland which is the English side of the border, so can count as an English breed.

They were bred with stamina for fox hunting. They would accompany hunters with foxhounds and if the fox went into a burrow the border terrier would go after it and either chase it out or bark to indicate where the fox could be dug out.

They are now popular as pets and as long as they are introduced to cats as puppies will live happily alongside them. Prospective owners should bear their stamina and terrier nature in mind though. They may be small, but they enjoy plenty of exercise and can show an interest in hunting rats.

Working Dog Breeds

The working group contains breeds that were mainly developed for guarding and fighting such as the mastiff or for pulling sleds like the Alaskan malamute.

Only one breed from the working group can claim to have been developed in Britain and that is the English mastiff, known here just as the mastiff.

16. English Mastiffs

The mastiff is the largest English dog breed and one of the most ancient. Roman writers commented on mastiff type dogs, some of which were taken for fighting in the 'games' held at the amphitheater in Rome (The Kennel Club). They were traditionally used for fighting and guarding.

Mastiff is originally a french name, however this doesn't mean that English mastiffs originated in France, just that the Norman conquest caused them to be renamed, as were many other things, as the conquered English people took up parts of the new language.

Colour wise; mastiffs are most commonly seen in fawn with black masking, but they can be apricot or brindle too, like Hooch pictured.

Toy Dog Breeds

The toy dog breeds have often been developed from breeds which originally had a job to do such as the terriers and the spaniels. However their appeal as companions began to override everything else and breeders started to select for companionship qualities and cuteness. All the toy breeds are very small or small.

Other toy breeds I could have featured are the Yorkshire terrier, Cavalier king Charles spaniel and King Charles spaniel.

17. English Toy Terriers

This pretty breed longs rather like a miniature doberman with the delicacy of an Italian greyhound. It has been in existence since the 19th century when it was known for its skills as a rat killer. However during its conversion to a companion breed it was selected for smaller size and reduced prey drive.The breed only ever comes in black and tan.

The kennel club lists the English toy terrier as a vulnerable native breed which means that not many puppies are registered each year. In 2006 only 103 ETT puppies were registered.

Utility Breeds

Utility is the group for dog breed which don't really fit anywhere else so it is a diverse group including akitas, poodles and shih tzus. It contains only one breed developed in England but it is perhaps the most famous English breed of all the bulldog; also known as the British or English bulldog.

18. Bulldogs

The fact that the bulldog is listed in the utility group rather than the working group is an indication of how far it has come from its roots as a dog for bull baiting and dog fighting in the 17th century.

The modern breed is shorter and more squat and unfortunately can suffer respiratory difficulties and be inclined to heat stress due to its 'squashed' nose. However it is far more congenial a companion than the fighting dog it descended from and they are a charismatic breed.

John Spencer on May 20, 2020:

Where is the Airedale ?

LKMore01 on May 07, 2013:

Voted up and Awesome, Nettlemere. This is a comphrehensive, well structured informative and entertaining HUB regarding a subject many of us happen to LOVE! Great job.

Rebecca Mealey from Northeastern Georgia, USA on May 07, 2013:

What great coverage of the differing dog breeds...not hard to see why the great HOTD honor was bestowed upon you. Great job!

Deb Welch on May 07, 2013:

Great Hub. Totally excellent - thorough - interesting and very well done. You earned HOTD. The Border Terrier - had a lot to say - nice dog. Enjoyed. Awesome.

Marcy J. Miller from Arizona on May 07, 2013:

Thoroughly enjoyed this, Nettlemere -- it's certainly deserving of the HOTD recognition. I was stunned and saddened to see that no Foxhounds were registered over a year's time. They evoke such an image of grand English country homes, well-appointed riders, and athletic Thoroughbreds coursing green fields. I hope there will always be a place for them. (I'm partial, as my longtime childhood companion was a Foxhound cross.)

What a great job on your hub!

Yvonne Spence from UK on May 07, 2013:

Congrats on your HOTD! Some of those dogs are so cute - especially the curly coated retriever!

Better Yourself from North Carolina on May 07, 2013:

Congrats on Hub of the Day! Beautiful dogs, great hub! I have a Jack Russell and a Jack Russell/Chihuahua mix both with lots of energy!

summerberrie on May 07, 2013:

Great hub. What beautiful animals. We are the proud owner of a bloodhound! Sometimes we are an embarrassed owner, but we always love her. Beautifully done and great info. Congrats on HOTD.

Marcy Goodfleisch from Planet Earth on May 07, 2013:

I love your expertise on animals! I have learned so much from your hubs - thanks for sharing your knowledge! Congrats on the HOTD - so deserved!

Jason Licerio from Philippines on May 07, 2013:

PUGS! Now I know they're not an English breed. Great hub!

german83 from Buenos Aires, Argentina on May 07, 2013:

Great Hub!!! I have a Beagle myself. All I can say about them is they are always wanting to eat something. You have to keep an eye on their weight...

Mary Craig from New York on May 07, 2013:

Its easy to see how this hub made HOD! Such comprehensive information on each of the breeds you wrote about and your pictures are superb! How in the world did you get to take pictures of so many breeds?

Voted up, useful, and interesting.

whonunuwho from United States on May 07, 2013:

Beautiful animals, all, and well done in your pictures and writing. Much to learn about many animals. whonu

traderjim on May 07, 2013:

Interesting. But am I the only one who appreciates half-breed dogs as well?

Robie Benve from Ohio on February 27, 2013:

Wow, so much info here about those lovely breeds, and wonderful photos to go with it! Great job and thanks for sharing. :)

Vinaya Ghimire from Nepal on February 24, 2013:

This is very interesting. I learned so many things here.

Nettlemere (author) from Burnley, Lancashire, UK on February 22, 2013:

Thanks for reading Dr Mark - I suspect that the foxhound may be more common now in America than it is over here.

Suhail - thank you for commenting - I like the English setter and do plan to fill in the gaps at some point, but the hub was getting long and I thought I'd best get it published!

Bac2basics - I agree the KC breed standards can cause real problems for the dogs as do trends amongst the breed judges as to exactly what they are looking for.

Eddy - thank you for the share. I perhaps should have included the before pic of the OES - it had come into the RSPCA terribly matted and a group of us spent an afternoon shaving it off. He was so patient with us.

aviannovice - I'm pleased you like it, I suspect some of the breeds aren't available in America, so you probably don't see them. I know there are quite a few American breeds that we don't get over here.

Suhail Zubaid aka Clark Kent from Mississauga, ON on February 21, 2013:

Further to my earlier comment. I resent not covering the English Setter though ;-)

Deb Hirt from Stillwater, OK on February 20, 2013:

This was very well done and enjoyable. I learned about a few dogs that I had no knowledge on. Wonderful!

Eiddwen from Wales on February 19, 2013:

I really enjoyed this hub and I am saving all my favourite animal hubs and this is most certainly one. I have never seen an Old English Sheepdog closely shaved before na dI was pleasantly surprised. Enjoy your day and I vote up and share.

Eddy.

Anne from Spain on February 19, 2013:

Hi Nettlemere. What an interesting hub this is. I agree with what you said about the English pointer being more suited to the Spanish climate. I do see pointer type dogs around here frequently and also the Spanish Podenco during hunting season ( which I hate) I´m also not in favour of the exacting standards the kennel club apply and feel this causes suffering, deformity and disease in many breeds . Never the less a great and interesting hub N :)

Suhail Zubaid aka Clark Kent from Mississauga, ON on February 18, 2013:

English Foxhound may again become in demand breed few decades down the road when fox population grows out of proportion and there will be a need to hunt few of them down every now and then.

:-)

Dr Mark from The Atlantic Rain Forest, Brazil on February 18, 2013:

Very interesing and thorough. I didn´t even realize how things were going for the Foxhound. Voted up and sharing.


The history of dog breeds

Modern dog breeds were created in Victorian Britain. The evolution of the domestic dog goes back tens of thousands of years — however, the multiple forms we see today are just 150 years old. Before the Victorian era, there were different types of dog, but there were not that many, and they were largely defined by their function. They were like the colors of a rainbow: variations within each type, shading into each other at the margins. And many terms were used for the different dogs: breed, kind, race, sort, strain, type, and variety.

By the time the Victorian era came to an end, only one term was used — breed. This was more than a change in language. Dog breeds were something entirely new, defined by their form and not their function. With the invention of breed, the different types became like the blocks on a paint color card — discrete, uniform, and standardized. The greater differentiation of breeds increased their number. In the 1840s, just two types of terrier were recognized by the end of the Victorian period, there were 10, and proliferation continued — today there are 27.

The advent of dog shows drove the creation of breed. The groups running these events and driving changes were styled the "dog fancy," and the aficionados of the new canines "doggy people." Breed standards were contingent and contested, decided as competitions selected the best dogs in each class. Owners gained prestige, and some income, from sales and stud fees. Competition at shows and in the market drove specialization, in the specification of ideal forms standardization, in the designs of physical conformations objectification, in viewing dogs' bodies as made up of parts commodification, in promoting dogs as tradable goods differentiation, in the proliferation of breeds and alienation, as ability and character became secondary to form.

The templates for breed conformation standards drew upon history, art, natural history, physiology and anatomy, and aesthetics. There was a tension in breeding between earned and inherited worth, that is, between "best in breed" winners, chosen in competitions, and "pure blood" dogs with pedigrees showing superior inheritance.

This tension points to the divisions among doggy people who were gentlemen-amateurs, and those who were trader-professionals. The former, predominantly from the upper classes, defined themselves as "dog lovers." They were men (few women were active in the dog fancy until the 1890s), who were themselves of the right breeding, to use their parlance. They claimed to be interested only in the long-term improvement of the nation's dogs, and saw themselves in a struggle against entrepreneurs, whom they styled as "dog dealers," interested only in short-term profit and social success.

Dog breeds were associated with class and gender. Sporting dogs were favored by the upper classes, even though few show dogs were used in the field. Middle-class owners wanted fashionable breeds that indicated status and wealth. Ladies favored toy breeds, as well as adopting fashion icons such as the borzois. There were working-class fanciers, particularly with bulldogs, terriers, and whippets. National identities were also evident. For example, there were struggles over the differentiation of the Skye from other terriers, and whether "immigrants" such as Newfoundlands, great Danes, and basset hounds had been improved sufficiently to count as British.

The new dog fancy's aim was to bring every dog up to standard, producing uniform breed populations and thus improving the nation's dogs. With individual breeds, the aim might be to change a particular feature for reasons of taste and aesthetics, or more radically to manufacture a whole new breed by adding or subtracting physical attributes. The most controversial new breed of the era was the Irish wolfhound, which had disappeared from Ireland in the mid 18th century when the wolf was hunted to extinction. However, one man set out to recover the lost breed, and his story exemplifies how the new breeds were invented culturally and materially.

George Augustus Graham (1833-1909) was an English, ex-Indian Army officer living in Gloucestershire. To the Victorians, the Irish wolfhound was a beast of legend, said by Pliny to be large enough to take on a lion, and by the 18th century French naturalist Comte de Buffon to be five foot tall. Graham assumed its blood must still be in dogs in Ireland, and set about its recovery. He began in libraries, collecting descriptions and drawings, and soon met a problem: There was no single physical type. At one pole, they were said to have been greyhound-like, having the speed to catch a wolf at the other, they were said to be large, great Dane types, able to bring down and kill their prey.

This is what one would expect before the adoption of breed: Hounds of a variety of shapes and sizes were used to hunt wolves, the important thing being their ability to do the job. However, in the 1860s and '70s, Graham was working with the new, essentialist, conformation-standard notion of breed, and had to settle upon one physical type — and he chose the greyhound. He drew his design, then started a breeding program to realize his ideal.

Graham began his enterprise in Ireland, buying dogs that were alleged to still have true blood. He had no success breeding from his purchases, so he turned to cross-breeding with Scottish deerhounds. He believed that this was legitimate, as the breeds were related. Indeed, there had been speculation that the Scottish deerhound was a descendant of the Irish wolfhound and that, hence, there was common blood. Following years of breeding and selection, he took a dog of his new design to the Irish Kennel Club Show in Dublin in 1879.

Controversy broke out. The reporter in Freeman's Journal, Dublin's oldest nationalist newspaper, dismissed Graham's dogs as mongrels and unworthy of "our conception of the race [that] might have his portrait painted as a 'national emblem,' with the harp, the 'sunburst' and the 'full-length figure of Erin.'" The reporter was probably guided by the image of the Irish wolfhound on the gravestone of Stephen O'Donohoe, a nationalist who lost his life in an attack on a police barracks in Tallaght near Dublin in 1867.

Graham's version of the Irish wolfhound was also attacked in England. The breed did not enjoy good health, and reproduction was difficult, which was put down to excessive inbreeding. G.W. Hickman, a Birmingham breeder of deerhounds, dismissed the whole enterprise. He argued that "as such an animal is now extinct, any attempt to revive it will simply be a manufacture more or less conjectural." He was certain that the old Irish dog was a great Dane type, and that Graham's dogs were creatures of "inference, supposition, and conjecture." He concluded: "That a gigantic rough-coated dog of the deerhound type may be produced by judicious breeding I do not doubt, but it must be by a still further large addition of foreign blood." Indeed, there was speculation that Graham had out crossed with great Danes for size, Tibetan mastiffs for coat length, and greyhounds for athleticism. His riposte: "I hardly think it any more manufactured than many other breeds that are now looked upon as 'pure.'" While the dog fancy's rhetoric celebrated pure bloodline, the reality was that crossbreeding was commonplace and necessary to avoid the health problems that came from inbreeding.

The changes wrought upon dogs in the Victorian era were revolutionary. It brought about the adoption of breed as a sole way of thinking about and breeding varieties of dog. This materially remodeled dogs' bodies, as well as their genetics. Kennel clubs across the world, responding to the recent critiques of "pedigree dogs," have begun to alter the conformation standards of some breeds and encourage genetic diversity. It remains to be seen how radical these changes will be, but the historical contingencies that shaped the invention of the modern dog can be read as giving license, not only to the remaking of individual breeds, but to reimagining the very category of breed itself.

This article was originally published by Aeon, a digital magazine for ideas and culture. Follow them on Twitter at @aeonmag.


Best Dog Breeds for Kids & Best Family Dogs

The Labrador Retriever is the most popular dog in the United States for a reason. The breed is friendly, patient, and trainable. The breed is extremely versatile, doing everything including hunting, showing, dock diving, tracking, obedience.

  • Personality: Friendly and outgoing, Labs play well with others
  • Energy Level: Very active Labs are high-spirited and not afraid to show it
  • Good with Children: Yes
  • Good with Other Dogs: With supervision
  • Shedding: Regularly
  • Grooming: Weekly brushing
  • Trainability: Eager to please
  • Height: 22.5-24.5 inches (male), 21.5-23.5 inches (female)
  • Weight: 65-80 pounds (male), 55-70 pounds (female)
  • Life Expectancy: 10-12 years
  • Barking Level: Medium

Find Labrador Retriever puppies on the AKC Marketplace.

2. Bulldog

The distinct and wrinkly Bulldog makes a wonderful companion to children. These loyal dogs can adapt to most atomospheres — city or country — and are happy to spend time with their families.

  • Personality: Calm, courageous, and friendly dignified but amusing
  • Energy Level: Not Very Active Bulldogs won’t beg to be exercised, but they require regular walks and the occasional romp
  • Good with Children: Yes
  • Good with other Dogs: Yes
  • Shedding: Seasonal
  • Grooming: Weekly
  • Trainability: Responds Well
  • Height: 14-15 inches
  • Weight: 50 pounds (male), 40 pounds (female)
  • Life Expectancy: 8-10 years
  • Barking Level: Quiet

Find Bulldog puppies on the AKC Marketplace.

3. Golden Retriever

Golden Retrievers originally came into prominence because of the desire for a medium-sized dog that would do well in wild-fowling, both upland game and waterfowl. Today, the breed’s versatility, intelligence, and agreeable personality suit it for many purposes, and it has become one of the most successful, recognizable, and popular breeds in all areas of competition.

  • Personality: Intelligent, friendly, and devoted.
  • Energy Level: Very Active This dog is active and energetic, and needs daily exercise.
  • Good with Children: Yes
  • Good with other Dogs: Yes
  • Shedding: Seasonal
  • Grooming: Occasional
  • Trainability: Eager To Please
  • Height: 23-24 inches (male), 21.5-22.5 inches (female)
  • Weight: 65-75 pounds (male), 55-65 pounds (female)
  • Life Expectancy: 10-12 years
  • Barking Level: Barks When Necessary

Find Golden Retriever puppies on the AKC Marketplace.

4. Beagle

The actual origin of the Beagle seems to be obscure with no reliable documentation on the earliest days of development. Their compact size, short, easy-to-care-for coat and intelligence make the Beagle an excellent family dog.

  • Personality: Merry, friendly, and curious
  • Energy Level: Very Active This quick, energetic and compact hound dog needs plenty of exercise
  • Good with Children: Yes
  • Good with other Dogs: Yes
  • Shedding: Seasonal
  • Grooming: Weekly
  • Trainability: Responds Well
  • Height: 13 inches & under, 13-15 inches
  • Weight: under 20 pounds (13 inches & under), 20-30 pounds (13-15 inches)
  • Life Expectancy: 10-15 years
  • Barking Level: Likes To Be Vocal

Find Beagle puppies on the AKC Marketplace.

5. Pug

The Pug is well described by the phrase “multum in parvo” which means “a lot of dog in a small space.” He is small but requires no coddling and his roguish face soon wiggles its way into the hearts of men, women and especially children, for whom this dog seems to have a special affinity. His great reason for living is to be near his people and to please them. He is comfortable in a small apartment or country home alike, easily adaptable to all situations.

  • Personality: Even-tempered, charming, mischievous and loving
  • Energy Level: Somewhat active Pugs are not exactly natural athletes, but they do have strong legs and endless curiosity—exercise both regularly
  • Good with Children: Better with supervision
  • Good with Other Dogs: With supervision
  • Shedding: Regularly
  • Grooming: Weekly brushing
  • Trainability: Agreeable
  • Height: 10-13 inches
  • Weight: 14-18 pounds
  • Life Expectancy: 13-15 years
  • Barking Level: Barks when necessary

Find Pug puppies on the AKC Marketplace.

6. Irish Setter

The Irish Setter, recognizable from media such as Big Red, first came into popular notice in the 18th century. The outgoing and trainable dog is great for active families, as the Irish Setter is high-energy and loves spending time outdoors.

  • Personality: Outgoing, sweet-natured, active, and trainable
  • Energy Level: Very Active High-energy dogs who love to run, Irish Setters need plenty of space and exercise
  • Good with Children: Yes
  • Good with other Dogs: Yes
  • Shedding: Seasonal
  • Grooming: Weekly
  • Trainability: Responds Well
  • Height: 27 inches (male), 25 inches (female)
  • Weight: 70 pounds (male), 60 pounds (female)
  • Life Expectancy: 12-15 years
  • Barking Level: Barks When Necessary

Find Irish Setter puppies on the AKC Marketplace.

7. Brussels Griffon

The Brussels Griffon i s a hearty, intelligent and active companion. He thrives on interaction, activity, and mental stimulation. His small size makes him a good apartment dweller as long as you give him a chance to burn off some energy.

  • Energy Level: Somewhat Active Griffs are spunky and love to play and to share long, daily walks with their owners
  • Good with Children: Better with Supervision
  • Good with other Dogs: With Supervision
  • Shedding: Seasonal
  • Grooming: Weekly
  • Trainability: Responds Well
  • Height: 7-10 inches
  • Weight: 8-10 pounds
  • Life Expectancy: 12-15 years
  • Barking Level: Barks When Necessary

Find Brussels Griffon puppies on the AKC Marketplace.

8. Newfoundland

Above all things, the Newfoundland must have the intelligence, the loyalty, and the sweetness which are his best-known traits. He must be able and willing to help his master perform his necessary tasks at command, and also have the intelligence to act on his own responsibility when rescue work demands it. Because of these traits, Newfoundlands make excellent family dogs.

  • Personality: Sweet, patient, devoted Newfs are famously good companions
  • Energy Level: Somewhat active Newfs like using their big, powerful bodies so they need some room to romp
  • Good with Children: Yes
  • Good with Other Dogs: Yes
  • Shedding: Seasonal
  • Grooming: Weekly brushing
  • Trainability: Easy training
  • Height: 28 inches (male), 26 inches (female)
  • Weight: 130-150 pounds (male), 100-120 pounds (female)
  • Life Expectancy: 9-10 years
  • Barking Level: Barks when necessary

Find Newfoundland puppies on the AKC Marketplace.

9. French Bulldog

French Bulldogs are one of the world’s most popular small-dog breeds, especially among city dwellers. The easygoing and adaptable breed is great for new families and responds well to training.

  • Personality: Playful, smart, adaptable, and completely irresistible
  • Energy Level: Not Very Active Frenchies are easygoing, not terribly athletic brisk walks will keep them trim
  • Good with Children: Yes
  • Good with other Dogs: Yes
  • Shedding: Seasonal
  • Grooming: Occasional
  • Trainability: Responds Well
  • Height: 11-13 inches
  • Weight: under 28 pounds
  • Life Expectancy: 10-12 years
  • Barking Level: Quiet

Find French Bulldog puppies on the AKC Marketplace.

10. Collie

Collies are legendary for their herding skills. They are strong, loyal, affectionate, responsive and fast. A Collie would be best suited for an active family as they are high-energy and love to move around.

  • Personality: Graceful, devoted, and proud
  • Energy Level: Very active Collies are active and need daily exercise, but they’re happy to chill at home the rest of the time
  • Good with Children: Yes
  • Good with Other Dogs: With supervision
  • Shedding: Seasonal
  • Grooming: Occasional
  • Trainability: Responds well
  • Height: 24-26 inches (male), 22-24 inches (female)
  • Weight: 60-75 pounds (male), 50-65 pounds (female)
  • Life Expectancy: 12-14 years
  • Barking Level: Likes to be vocal

Find Collie puppies on the AKC Marketplace.


The 45 Best Large Dog Breeds for People Who Want Impressive Pets

Your family's about to get bigger — a lot bigger.

Looking to adopt a new furry friend into the family? Bigger isn't always better, of course, but when it comes to finding your perfect canine companion, a teeny-tiny Chihuahua won't exactly cut it as a jogging partner. Typically tipping the scales at 50-80 pounds (although some varieties may skew slightly larger or smaller), these big dog breeds are great for if you want an active exercise pal or a pet that's easy to train — plus, they can make great cuddle partners and lovable family dogs, too!

Before adopting a large dog, anticipate the time and budget that you can realistically provide for your pet. Owning a dog can cost about $15,000 or more over its lifetime, according to the American Kennel Club. That money can go towards veterinary visits, grooming, and food, just to name a few preliminary expenses. All large breeds will require more kibble, but a Poodle, for example, will need more frequent haircuts than a Boxer. A highly active breed will also demand a lot more exercise versus the couch potatoes of the dog world, but all pups deserve basic obedience training, regular walks, and obviously your love and attention.

And if you're looking for a pet that's more lap-sized, check out these small and medium-sized dog breeds. Curious about the biggest, most giant dog breeds? These pups weigh in the 75-150 pound range (or more!).


Dog Breed Reviews: Honest Reviews of 180 Dog Breeds

My dog breed reviews include positives AND negatives – good and bad traits and characteristics – on temperament, personality, behavior, exercise requirements, shedding, etc.

Reviews are based on my personal and professional experiences – over 35 years working with dogs – plus my extensive research. I'm Michele Welton – breed selection consultant, obedience instructor, and published author of 15 dog books.

If you're trying to choose a dog breed, please be sure to visit my articles on choosing & finding the right dog.

tiny dog breeds
5-12" | 3-10 lbs
small dog breeds
12-15" | 10-20 lbs
midsize dog breeds
15-18" | 20-40 lbs
medium size dog breeds
18-22" | 40-60 lbs
large dog breeds
22-26" | 60-90 lbs
giant dog breeds
over 26" | over 100 lbs

Affenpinscher
Dog Breed Review
Afghan Hound
Dog Breed Review
Airedale Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Akita Inu
Dog Breed Review
Alaskan Malamute
Dog Breed Review
American Bulldog
Dog Breed Review
American
Cocker Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
American
Eskimo Dog
Dog Breed Review
American
Pit Bull Terrier
Dog Breed Review
American Staffordshire Terrier
Dog Breed Review
American
Water Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
Anatolian Shepherd Dog
Dog Breed Review
Appenzeller Mountain Dog
Dog Breed Review
Argentine Dogo
Dog Breed Review
Australian
Cattle Dog
Dog Breed Review
Australian Kelpie
Dog Breed Review
Australian Shepherd
Dog Breed Review
Australian Terrier
Dog Breed Review

Basenji
Dog Breed Review
Basset Hound
Dog Breed Review
Beagle
Dog Breed Review
Bearded Collie
Dog Breed Review
Beauceron
Dog Breed Review
Bedlington Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Belgian Laekenois
Dog Breed Review
Belgian Malinois
Dog Breed Review
Belgian Sheepdog (Groenendael)
Dog Breed Review
Belgian Tervuren
Dog Breed Review
Bernese
Mountain Dog
Dog Breed Review
Bichon Frise
Dog Breed Review
Bloodhound
Dog Breed Review
Bolognese
Dog Breed Review
Border Collie
Dog Breed Review
Border Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Borzoi
Dog Breed Review
Boston Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Bouvier des Flandres
Dog Breed Review
Boxer
Dog Breed Review
Briard
Dog Breed Review
Brittany Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
Brussels Griffon
Dog Breed Review
Bulldog (English)
Dog Breed Review
Bullmastiff
Dog Breed Review
Bull Terrier (English)
Dog Breed Review

Cairn Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Canaan Dog
Dog Breed Review
Cane Corso
Dog Breed Review
Cardigan
Welsh Corgi
Dog Breed Review
Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
Cesky Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Chesapeake Bay Retriever
Dog Breed Review
Chihuahua
Dog Breed Review
Chinese Crested
Dog Breed Review
Chinese Shar-pei
Dog Breed Review
Chinook
Dog Breed Review
Chow Chow
Dog Breed Review
Clumber Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
Cocker Spaniel (American)
Dog Breed Review
Cocker Spaniel (English)
Dog Breed Review
Collie (Rough
and Smooth)
Dog Breed Review
Coonhounds
Dog Breed Review
Coton de Tulear
Dog Breed Review
Curly-Coated Retriever
Dog Breed Review

tiny dog breeds
5-12" | 3-10 lbs
small dog breeds
12-15" | 10-20 lbs
midsize dog breeds
15-18" | 20-40 lbs
medium size dog breeds
18-22" | 40-60 lbs
large dog breeds
22-26" | 60-90 lbs
giant dog breeds
over 26" | over 100 lbs

Dachshund
Dog Breed Review
Dalmatian
Dog Breed Review
Dandie Dinmont Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Doberman Pinscher
Dog Breed Review
Dogo Argentino
Dog Breed Review
Dogue de Bordeaux
Dog Breed Review

English Cocker Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
English Pointer
Dog Breed Review
English Setter
Dog Breed Review
English Shepherd
Dog Breed Review
English Springer Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
English Toy Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
Entlebucher Mountain Dog
Dog Breed Review

Field Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
Fila Brasileiro
Dog Breed Review
Finnish Spitz
Dog Breed Review
Flat-Coated Retriever
Dog Breed Review
Fox Terrier
(Smooth)
Dog Breed Review
Fox Terrier
(Wirehaired)
Dog Breed Review
French Bulldog
Dog Breed Review

German Pinscher
Dog Breed Review
German Shepherd
Dog Breed Review
German Shorthaired Pointer
Dog Breed Review
German Wirehaired Pointer
Dog Breed Review
Giant Schnauzer
Dog Breed Review
Glen of Imaal Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Golden Retriever
Dog Breed Review
Gordon Setter
Dog Breed Review
Great Dane
Dog Breed Review
Greater Swiss Mountain Dog
Dog Breed Review
Great Pyrenees
Dog Breed Review
Greyhound
Dog Breed Review

Havanese
Dog Breed Review
Ibizan Hound
Dog Breed Review
Irish Setter
Dog Breed Review
Irish Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Irish Water Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
Irish Wolfhound
Dog Breed Review
Italian Greyhound
Dog Breed Review
Italian Spinone
Dog Breed Review

Jack Russell Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Japanese Chin
Dog Breed Review
Keeshond
Dog Breed Review
Kerry Blue Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Komondor
Dog Breed Review
Kuvasz
Dog Breed Review

Labrador Retriever
Dog Breed Review
Lagotto Romagnolo
Dog Breed Review
Lakeland Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Leonberger
Dog Breed Review
Lhasa Apso
Dog Breed Review
Louisiana Catahoula
Leopard Dog
Dog Breed Review
Lowchen
(Little Lion Dog)
Dog Breed Review

Maltese
Dog Breed Review
Manchester Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Mastiff (Old English)
Dog Breed Review
Miniature Australian Shepherd
Dog Breed Review
Miniature Bull Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Miniature Pinscher
Dog Breed Review
Miniature Poodle
Dog Breed Review
Miniature Schnauzer
Dog Breed Review
Mixed Breed
Dog Breed Review

tiny dog breeds
5-12" | 3-10 lbs
small dog breeds
12-15" | 10-20 lbs
midsize dog breeds
15-18" | 20-40 lbs
medium size dog breeds
18-22" | 40-60 lbs
large dog breeds
22-26" | 60-90 lbs
giant dog breeds
over 26" | over 100 lbs

Neapolitan Mastiff
Dog Breed Review
Newfoundland
Dog Breed Review
Norfolk Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Norwegian Buhund
Dog Breed Review
Norwegian Elkhound
Dog Breed Review
Norwegian Lundehund
Dog Breed Review
Norwich Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Nova Scotia Duck
Tolling Retriever
Dog Breed Review
Old English Sheepdog
Dog Breed Review
Otterhound
Dog Breed Review

Papillon
Dog Breed Review
Pekingese
Dog Breed Review
Pembroke Welsh Corgi
Dog Breed Review
Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen
Dog Breed Review
Pharaoh Hound
Dog Breed Review
Pit Bull Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Pointer (English)
Dog Breed Review
Polish Lowland Sheepdog
Dog Breed Review
Pomeranian
Dog Breed Review
Poodle (Miniature)
Dog Breed Review
Poodle (Standard)
Dog Breed Review
Poodle (Toy)
Dog Breed Review
Portuguese Water Dog
Dog Breed Review
Pug
Dog Breed Review
Puli
Dog Breed Review
Queensland Heeler
Dog Breed Review
Rat Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Rhodesian Ridgeback
Dog Breed Review
Rottweiler
Dog Breed Review

Saint Bernard
Dog Breed Review
Saluki
Dog Breed Review
Samoyed
Dog Breed Review
Schipperke
Dog Breed Review
Scottish Deerhound
Dog Breed Review
Scottish Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Sealyham Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Shetland Sheepdog
(Sheltie)
Dog Breed Review
Shiba Inu
Dog Breed Review
Shih Tzu
Dog Breed Review
Shiloh Shepherd
Dog Breed Review
Siberian Husky
Dog Breed Review
Silky Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Skye Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Sloughi
Dog Breed Review
Soft-Coated Wheaten Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Spinone Italiano
Dog Breed Review
Staffordshire Bull Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Standard Poodle
Dog Breed Review
Standard Schnauzer
Dog Breed Review
Sussex Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
Swedish Vallhund
Dog Breed Review

Tibetan Mastiff
Dog Breed Review
Tibetan Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
Tibetan Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Tosa Inu
Dog Breed Review
Toy Fox Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Toy Poodle
Dog Breed Review
Transylvanian Griffinfinch
Very Special Breed!

tiny dog breeds
5-12" | 3-10 lbs
small dog breeds
12-15" | 10-20 lbs
midsize dog breeds
15-18" | 20-40 lbs
medium size dog breeds
18-22" | 40-60 lbs
large dog breeds
22-26" | 60-90 lbs
giant dog breeds
over 26" | over 100 lbs

Vizsla
Dog Breed Review
Weimaraner
Dog Breed Review
Welsh Springer Spaniel
Dog Breed Review
Welsh Terrier
Dog Breed Review
West Highland White Terrier
Dog Breed Review
Whippet
Dog Breed Review
White Shepherd
Dog Breed Review
Wirehaired Pointing Griffon
Dog Breed Review
Xoloitzcuintle
Dog Breed Review
Yorkshire Terrier
(Yorkie)
Dog Breed Review

Copyright © 2000-2019 by Michele Welton. All rights reserved. No part of this website may be copied, displayed on another website, or distributed in any way without permission from the author.


Watch the video: Long Hair German Shepherd. German Shepherd Dog Breed. Scoobers


Comments:

  1. Shakak

    I have a similar situation. We need to discuss.

  2. Igasho

    You answered quickly ...

  3. Eliezer

    he is absolutely right



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