150+ Names for Dogs With Different Colored Eyes (Heterochromia)


Layne is an animal lover and grew up in a household full of rescued critters. She is a registered veterinary technician.

Name Ideas for Dogs With Heterochromia

Does your dog have one blue eye and one brown eye? One green eye and one golden eye? How special! The technical term for dogs with different colored eyes is heterochromia: "hetero" means "different," and "chromia" means "colors." Melanin is what determines eye color, so it's possible that your dog has the following unique eye colors:

  • Complete heterochromia: One iris is a completely different color than the other.
  • Partial heterochromia: Partial heterochromia refers to an iris with two tones, while the other iris is the predominant color.
  • Central heterochromia: The color change is mostly around the center of one pupil and radiates outward.

Dog Breeds That Have Two Different Eye Colors

  • Siberian Huskies
  • Australian Shepherds
  • Catahoula Leopard Dogs
  • Shih Tzus
  • Border Collies
  • Great Danes
  • Dachshunds
  • Shetland Sheepdogs

Great Name Ideas for Dogs With Two Different Eye Colors

Abracadabra

Bluff

Chorus

Alaska

Bounce

Conjure

Alpha

Bright

Crux

Apollo

Camille

Darling

Arch

Celeste

Dash

Aura

Center

Daydream

Betta

Chakra

Dazzle

Blink

Charm

Desire

Divinity

Essence

Ghost

Dolore

Fancy

Glimmer

Double

Fire

Goblin

Dove

Flair

Goddess

Dream

Flash

Goldie

Dyna (Dynamic)

Fleck

Groove

Dyno (Dynamic)

Force

Gusto

Elf

Genie

Haunt

Energy

Genius

Hercules

23 Names Inspired by Celebrities With Heterochromia

List collected from GoodHouseKeeping.com

Pet Name IdeaCelebrityIdentity

Mila OR Kuna

Mila Kunis

Mila is a well-known actress from "That '70s Show"

Dominic OR Dom OR Woods

Dominic Sherwood

An actor from "Shadowhunters"

Kate OR Boss OR Bossworth

Kate Bossworth

Kate is an actress and has one blue and one blue-brown eye.

Kiefer

Kiefer Sutherland

Julia Robert's former fiancé.

Jane OR Seymour

Jane Seymour

The actress from "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman"

Max OR Sherzer

Max Sherzer

If you're a fan—the Washington Nationals pitcher.

Elizabeth OR Liza OR Berkley

Elizabeth Berkley

An actress from "Showgirls" and "Saved by the Bell"

Josh OR Henderson

Josh Henderson

An actor

Bill

Bill Pullman

The president in the movie "Independence Day"

Alice OR Eve

Alice Eve

"She's Out of My League" and "Star Trek" actress.

Henry or Cavill

Henry Cavill

Played superman.

More Name Ideas for Dogs With Heterochromia

Hermes

Joy

Magic

Hocus

Juggler

Marble

Hope

Jupiter

Matcha

Hypnos

Koda

Merlin

Illusion

Kratos

Meteor

Iris

Lily

Miracle

Jazz

Love

Mirage

Joie

Lucid

Moon

Joker

Luna

Mystic

Nova

Poseidon

Ruse

Oceanus

Presto

Secret

Old Blue

Prism

Shifter

Opal

Psyche

Siren

Orchid

Puck

Sol

Phantom

Queen

Sorceror

Pixie

Rainbow

Sparkle

Pluto

Reason

Spectre

Pocus

Rosey

Spirit

Sprinkle

Truth

Verve

Sprite

Tully

Viola

Spunk

Twinkle

Vision

Sterling

Uranus

Wish

Storm

Utopia

Wizard

Sympathy

Valor

Yen

Triton

Venus

Zest

A Beautiful Dog With Heterochromia

© 2019 Laynie H

Laynie H (author) from Bend, Oregon on March 08, 2020:

Hi Anagram—I love Milly, too

Anagram on March 08, 2020:

Milly is beautiful


Heterochromia is also known as heterochromia Idris of heterochromia iridium. It may be congenital (genetic) or may develop over time.

Dogs with two different eye colors

Heredity- Congenital Heterochromia

Puppies with different colored irises are likely to have been born with heterochromia.

Acquired Heterochromia

Usually due to inflammation or injury. It may be due to the use of certain eye drops. Some eye drops change eye color or damages the iris. The presence of some brain tumors may alter the color of the iris. This may show effects in one or both eyes.

Sectoral Heterochromia

Also known as partial heterochromia. One of part of the iris is different in color from the remaining part of the eye.

Complete Heterochromia

One iris (one eye) is different in color from the other.

Central Heterochromia

There are different colors radiating from the pupil giving an impression of spikes of colors.


Why do border collies have 2 different colored eyes?

Heterochromia iridis is a rare (and often strikingly gorgeous) condition in which animals, including humans, have two different colored eyes. It's particularly noticeable in dogs and cats. Heterochromia occurs as a result of excess or lack of melanin in one eye. It may be congenital, or develop over time.

Likewise, do Border Collies keep their blue eyes? According to Dogster, breeds that occasionally carry the blue-eyed gene include Siberian huskies and Weimaraners. Dogs that commonly bear a merle coat pattern such as border collies, Australian shepherds, and dachshunds, can also carry their blue eyes later into life.

Hereof, what color eyes does a border collie have?

Most common in black-based dogs are dark brown eyes. But Border Collies of any color can have blue eyes, or one blue eye, like Josie, right. This latter is often referred to as "walleyed". Black-based dogs can also have amber eyes, but eyes of this color are most often found in red dogs.

Why do Huskies have 2 different colored eyes?

Heterochromia is caused due to uneven melanin distribution and inbreeding. It occurs in many other breeds of dogs (Australian Shepherd would probably be right behind the Husky), cats, and horses. However, sometimes, melanin isn't evenly distributed between the two irises, causing the difference in color.


Folklore and reality

There are different legends about dogs with differently colored eyes. Some dogs with oddly colored eyes are said to protect heaven and earth at the same time, according to Native American lore. Another story says that while heterochromatic dogs protect mankind, brown or red-eyed dogs are spirit dogs. Another Inuit legend states that sled dogs with this odd-eye coloring are faster than those with same colored eyes! The truth is that there is a genetic reason behind the difference in coloring. Melanin, a pigment responsible for coloring the eyes deferentially, resulting in odd-eyed coloring. Now that that is settled, let's see which breeds are heterochromatic.


Why Do Some Dogs Have Two Different Colored Eyes?

It’s common knowledge that dogs have brown eyes. Some dogs, like Australian Shepherds or Huskies will have blue ones. But on average, all dogs have brown eyes. And they’re quite pretty too. My dad never liked to admit it, but once or twice we’d catch him singing Van Morrison’s “Brown Eyed Girl” to my dog whenever the song was on the radio. She, like many other dogs, had adorable brown eyes. But there are occasions when nature will take over and give our dogs something really special. On rare occasions, you’ll find dogs who have both blue and brown eyes together.

Not only are these really pretty combinations, but they’re also rare. The condition that causes one eye to be blue and one eye to be brown is a condition known as heterochromia. The two-toned eyes can occur in both humans as well as canines. But it doesn’t just stop there. Cats can have it too, as well as some horses. Who would’ve known? The disorder is inherited from both the mother and the father. Most of the time heterochromia is an inherited genetic occurrence, but occasionally it can be a result of an injury. If your dog sustains an injury to their eye, or they develop a disease of the eye, they can sometimes experience a change in their eye color. But it’s really rare and heterochromia is usually the main cause for two different eye colors.

Heterochromia can happen in any dog, but there are breeds that tend to have a higher rate of it happening than others. Some of these breeds who are more likely to have two different eye colors are Australian Shepherds, Catahoula Leopard Dogs, Great Danes, Dalmatians, and Huskies. However, when Dalmatians have one or two blue eyes it could actually be a result of them being deaf as well – for some reason blue eyes in these dogs are linked to deafness in the breed.

While two-toned eyes are certainly striking, there is no need to be alarmed. The condition is genetic and there is generally no need to worry. But dogs with heterochromia might also be linked to glaucoma, so if you suspect that there might be something wrong, definitely talk to your vet about all concerns.

Does your dog have heterochromia? Let us know!


Watch the video: What are the Strangest Dog Eye Colors? - ROCADOG QNA 2


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